Most people are familiar with the idea of organic foods or may have noticed them in food stores. You know which items are organic. Organic items usually cost more and are packaged differently. Keep reading for information to help you start producing organic produce right in your yard.

If your green thumb starts to wilt during those long winter months when your garden is buried beneath a foot of snow, learn how to grow microgreens to provide yourself with fresh, healthy salads, sandwich toppings and garnishes all year round. Microgreens require very little sunlight and are easy to grow indoors. Some common microgreens include kale, dill, basil, spinach, and chard.

Sow plants in succession to each other for a steady harvest. When growing vegetables such as corn, snap peas, and lettuce that mature on a very predictable schedule, make two or three sowings two weeks apart to lengthen the harvest season. You can also plant two different varieties on the same day with different maturation times to ensure a longer season.

Try growing crops that are easy to store or store themselves. If handled properly and gently, given the right amount of time to cure, garlic, onions, sweet potatoes, squash, dry beans, or shallots will keep for a very long time in a cool, dry place. No canning or freezing required. This will ensure having fresh vegetables from the garden all winter long.

You can get most of the gardening tools you need second-hand. Visit yard sales and estate sales near you to look for gardening tools at a very low price. You can also visit online trading or donation groups to trade items you have for gardening tools, or even to find find free tools.

If the grass under your tree is turning brown, consider thinning out your tree. Grass needs plenty of sunshine, and chances are, your tree might be blocking out too much sunlight from the grass. If you trim back and thin out some branches your grass will get a little more sunshine.

Don’t plant your seedlings or young plants too deeply. The top of a root ball of a large shrub or tree seedling should be just above the soil level, and then covered up with mulch to protect it. This allows the roots to breathe and keeps the tree or shrub healthy.

A wonderful treat for your indoor houseplants is to take them outside periodically and let them bask in the glory of a summer rainstorm. You will be treating them to higher humidity and longer hours of daylight that far surpasses the stale conditions they may be getting indoors! You will want to minimize too much direct sunlight and make sure your plant containers have good drainage holes so that extra rainwater doesn’t collect to cause root rot. Some quality time in the outdoors will pay off with lush, healthy plants year-round!

To make nutrient fertilizer from stuff you have around the house, look at what you have for breakfast. Both old coffee grounds and tea bags make an excellent fertilizer, especially when it comes to plants that love acid. Eggshells add alkaline to your soil, and bananas are the best source of the potassium that roses thrive on.

Even if you think you will remember which plants are which later, tag your plants properly from the beginning. Plants can look very different after just a few weeks. Write plant names on flat rocks with a permanent marker in a decorative way, and lay them next to each plant so that you can save yourself from confusion down the road.

It is important to wear eye protection when you are gardening. Many people do not realize that chemicals can easily get splashed, fertilizer can be blown or dirt can land in their eyes. All of these things can cause major damage to the eye. If wearing eye protection the chances of having your eyes damaged are greatly decreased.

Choose silvers and grays to lighten up the garden on dull days and shine in the moonlight. While most gray-leafed plants are attractive enough to hold their own in the garden, they are often used due to the effect they have on surrounding colors. They make pastel colors look brighter, and tone down the effect of vivid colors. Most plants with silver or gray foliage are native to the Mediterranean, therefore requiring little watering in the dry months. The best known silver and gray plants are dusty miller, lychnis, silver lace and artemisia.

Make sure your seeds have enough room to grow. It is fine to have many seeds in one container before they sprout, but you will have to replant them as they grow. Use containers that are big enough for one plant, and avoid having more than one plant in each container.

Weed control in your organic garden will be more challenging than a conventional garden because you can’t use chemical herbicides. One of the best ways to control weeds without using chemicals is creating ground cover with mulch. Save tree trimmings and grass clippings from elsewhere in your garden and spread them around your plants to a depth of about 3 inches. This should be enough to prevent weeds from germinating and growing.

Consider solving your weed problem without the use of toxic chemicals. Pile newspapers on top of each other to kill weeds. Weeds need sunlight to grow. When you put newspaper over them, they suffocate from lack of sunlight. As an added benefit, the newspapers will decompose over time, becoming organic compost. One way to enhance the appearance of your garden if you are using newspapers is to add layer of mulch.

Growing your garden at home might not be the most convenient thing for you, but you will save a lot of money and always have the confidence that what you’re eating and feeding your family is as fresh and as healthy as possible. Use the tips you’ve learned here and get started on your garden today.

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